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  1. #1

    Holding Tank/Cistern Disinfection


    I have a slow filling well and I want to install a 1200 gallon holding tank. I am not sure what the safest way to disinfect it is. My plan is to bury a plastic tank install some type of pump control system for water collection, draw from the reserve, and let the tank refill throughout the day and into night. My concern is bacteria. I have a filter system and a UV light where the water goes into the house but is this all that I need. Any information is appreciated.

    Thanks.
    Jason

  2. #2
    Past Newbie
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    Hi Jason,


    If your well has been in service for more than a week, have the water tested for bacteria, TDS, pH, sulfates, nitrates, hardness, alkalinity, iron and lead.

    The water filter you mention is probably an undersink Point of Use (POU) unit. The carbon cartrige replacements state that feed water has to be chemically disinfected. You need to disinfect the holding tank with chlorine, ozone, bromine, iodine, chlorine dioxide or peroxide. Your choice depending on budget, available space, etc.

    If adding chemicals to your water gives you the willies, don't worry. The carbon in your filter will remove it and by-products. 1 ppm of free chlorine won't do anything to your skin. Maybe it could change the wife's hair coloring depending on water chemistry and type of hair. You can put in a shower filter for that.

    Hope this helps,

    David

  3. #3
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    Although I'm not a real fan of them, this might be a good time to use a chlorine pellet dropper on the casing. That would chlorinate the water in the well. Otherwise I know of no chlorinator for in the tank, but if you don't chlorinate, the tank will grow algae etc. and make cleaning/sanitizing of the tank necessary.

    Gary
    Quality Water Associates
    www.qualitywaterassociates.com
    Softener Forum: http://www.qualitywaterassociates.com/phpBB2/index.php

  4. #4
    Pump guy speedbump's Avatar
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    My suggestion would be a chemical feed pump used with either a flow switch or running off the pressure switch. The chlorine mixture could be very weak so as not to over chlorinate. Feed pumps come in 5 to 30 gpm ranges. And each range is 100% adjustable. I don't know how long a feed pump will last running 12/7 or so, but that is the only automatic device I would recommend.

    I'm not a fan of the pellet feeders either, I have seen what they can do to the metal casing of a well and the droppipe etc. in a short period of time.

    I recommended Jason post here because I knew you guys would have some ideas for him.

    bob...


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  5. #5
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    Better than a dossing pump is Gary's PVC in-line chlorine feeder. Cheaper, never needs to prep solutions, once every couple of months operation vs. once a week with a dossing pump. Plus the holding tank serves as Contact Tank. I've installed dozens of these over the years, no problems. O-ring lasts like 4 years and on some water conditions they need to be cleaned for scale buildup every year.

    After that you can de-chlorinate at the kitchen, showers or whole house if you wish.

    David


  6. #6
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    I really dislike solution feeders. IMO they are a major pain to keep in adjustment because the solution weakens in the tank, the owner misses mixing more solution in a timely manner and then you throw out the solution and start all over.Here you then have a tank full of unacceptable water and no way to drain it... I have experience with a guy that allowed a well driller to do this to get rid of H2S. Wha ta mess with algea and slime all over the inside of the tank. The owner was real tired of getting in the tank once every 4-6 weeks to scrub it clean with bleach water. And no sooner than he did that, a very foul/rotten odor would be back in his water.

    I thought of the inlet erosion pellet chlorinator but, my patented version uses the pressure tank operation to feed the chlorine, and I'm not sure it would work outdside with no pressure tank.

    Now there is a water powered erosion chlorinator that I just remembered and it might work but again, outside and above ground,I'm not sure... And anything not designed to be in direct sunlight may not last long.

    I'd do my best to forego this tank buried in the yard and see what can be done about the well. What is the recovery rate? How deep is the well. What diameter is the well casing? What pump is in the well and how deep is it set in the well?

    In other words, maybe there is no need for this tank. Or a tank inside would be a much better idea.

    Gary
    Quality Water Associates
    www.qualitywaterassociates.com
    Softener Forum: http://www.qualitywaterassociates.com/phpBB2/index.php

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