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  1. #1
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    Hunlock Creek, PA, USA.
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    Low Water Supply

    Hello all, first a thanks to all the great posts, they have been very helpful in diagnising some of my problems with my well. I bought an estate a little over 2 months ago. The one test I had done was water quality. The results prompted me to put in a complete water treatment system included and acid neutralizer/water softener and a UV light. I also replaced all the copper pipe with 3/4" and 1/2" cpvc, Installed a new Pressure Tank and new water heater. All was well until a few days ago. My wife called me and said there was no water. An hour later it was back, only to disappear again. The best diagnosis I could come to was a burned out motor on the submersible pump, so I replaced it. (figured wgy not since the pump was over 10 years old). I replaced it with a water ace 1HP 3 wire pump from Lowe's (Had to use the credit card [xx(] ) I also installed a new control panel for the pump, a new 30-50 pressure switch, a new pressure guage and for saftey I added a pressure relief valve. Basically my entire plumbing system is brand new. After installing the new pump I filled and drained the pressure tank (flowtec 82 gal equivalent diaphram tank) several times. All done and water flowing great. i went up stairs and started to fill the bath tub and only got about 4 inches in it when the water stopped flowing. I think the problem is We're overdrawing the well. I pulled the pump again and measured the well this time. The well is 6" well going @190' deep. There is @ 45' of water in the bottom and the pump sits @ 14' off the bottom. Again the pump is a 1HP and is rated at i believe 10GPM at 175 ft. if I remember correctly.

    Anyway, sorry for being long winded but I wanted to cover everything.

    My questions are am I correct in assuming the well is being over pumped. If I let it sit for about an hour water will return and allow the tank to build up to 50PSI. Also, what would be the most cost effective way to balance the water load. Would having the well drilled deeper or a new well deeper solve my problems or will this only be a temp fix. Would installing a holding tank in the basement with a seperate pump and float switch be a better way to manage the demand on the well. We are a family of 2 adults, 2 young boys and an infant. Any advise would be greatly appreciated and thanks for the patients with all my gab.


    Specs again fo review:
    1HP 10GPM 3-wire Water Ace Submersible Pump
    6" Well, 190' deep, there is @ 45' water from bottom
    Flowtec 82gal diaphram tank
    1" Plastic Pipe off well to 30-50 pressure switch
    3/4" CPVC to tank and treatment system and H/W tank
    1/2" CPVC to remaining fixtures
    2 adults, 2 young kids, 1 infant
    New 30-50 pressure switch
    New control panel for pump


    Thanks

  2. #2
    When you run out of water, is the pump still running? Do you turn it off. When submersibles run dry, they air lock and can fry... To determine if you are indeed running out of water you need to be at the well head, you can open a faucet and listen at the well head, you can actually here the pump suck air and stop pumping.

    Rancher

  3. #3
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    Hunlock Creek, PA, USA.
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    I have been turning it off to prevent this. After about an hour it will pumpfine. I'll try to listen in next time it happens.

  4. #4
    Pump guy speedbump's Avatar
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    Jun 2005
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    Murphy, NC. USA.
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    It's odd that this just started. It would seem that a low yield well would always be a low yield well.

    If that is the problem, the second tank with another pump would be the way to go. You can then put a Pumptec on the pump to protect it from running dry. You will also have a better supply of water to work with. If you have an ampmeter you can check the amperage when the pump stops pumping. The reading should drop several amps if the pump is running dry.

    I'm not crazy about your choice of equipment. You can do a lot better quality wise for about the same money.

    bob...

    Products and Pricing

  5. #5
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    I'm not crazy about the choice either. Unfortunatly we used up all our savings rehabing the home and I had to use my Lowe's Card to replace the pump etc. The home did sit empty for 2 years before we bought it. Is it possible the well just had a build up of water that we slowly depleted over the 2 months? Also what is a Pumptec and how does it work? Would having another well drilld deper yield more water? I'm still learning about wells, I'm used to city water.


  6. #6
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    In response to rather the pump is sucking air, the answer is yes, I dodn't even have to listen at the well head. Last night I regenerated the softener and towards then end of the cycle the water ran out, I could actually hear the air in the line in the basement. It took about 2-3 hours for the well to fill up enough the recharge the water lines and refill the tank.

    I was doing some research on-line and read about hydrofracting. Does anyone have any experience with this and is it usually successful? The info I read said this along with a well manager control and a holding tank often eleviates the problem.

  7. #7
    Pump guy speedbump's Avatar
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    I have heard of Hydrofracting, but don't have any first hand experience, so I won't comment.

    Drilling deeper may or may not yield more water. Talk to the local drillers about that.

    The Pumptec senses low amps when the pump runs out of water and shuts it off. You can set it to stay off until manually reset, or up to 90 minutes.

    bob...

    Products and Pricing

  8. #8
    Past Newbie
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    , Massachusetts, .
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    Hydrofracturing the well most of the time will give you good results but its a gamble.We have fraqued wells that have went from 2 gallons per minute to 35 gallons per minute and 1 gallon per minute to 5. It all depends on the condition of the openings in the rock and how many there are. Sometimes the deeper the well the better the results because there could be more zones present in a deeper hole. Where i am the cost to have it done at your depth would be 1500.00 to 1800.00.

    SAM

  9. #9
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    Got a quote over the phone today for $200 to hydrofract, another said he wouldn't recommend hydrofracting a well only 190'. The one driller also quoted @ $8-$9 per foot drilled for a new well as my old one is not accessible by truck. Is this a resonable price?? or has anyone tried drilling their own well with one of the many DIY drills available??

    Thanks for the feedback thus far.

  10. #10
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    Oops, sorry, that quote was for $2000, no $200

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