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Thread: Will this work??!?

  1. #1

    Will this work??!?

    I have a brand new well. Supposedly 85 foot, 30 gpm, 6" metal casing. I lowered a string in it and think I hit water at just under 30 foot.

    I have NO buildings on this property, and finally have electricity at the pole. I put in a 220 outlet on the pole, too.

    I'd like to be able to water my garden and orchard and plant grass. I don't want anything TOO permanent until I build a barn or house (to put a pressure tank, etc., in).

    Will the following work??

    I would put a deep-well submersible pump in, run the electric cable and safety rope out the hole in the cap. Plug in the cable to the electric pole when I need water. I'd run the water line from the pump up to the top of the casing, and cut it flush. Then I'd put in an adapter and quick-connect that would fasten to a hose. (I found the parts at Menards...)

    When I want to use water, I'd take the cap off the well, "quick-connect" the water hose, and flip the breaker on the electric pole.

    Will this work? What else would I need? Someone mentioned a "torque-arrestor" and "stand-offs"?

    I'm absolutely clueless about this stuff, but can't afford the $1600 the well-driller wants to install a pump. (I will probably hire someone when I need to make it more permanent, however). I found a 2-wire 1/2 hp or 3/4 hp pump at Menards for just over $300, and they have the wiring cable and hose, too.





  2. #2
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    Yes it will work. You need a sanitary well seal. 6" by whatever size pipe you hang the pump on. This is what the pump hangs from and keeps criters out of the well. Otherwise rabbits and rats and stuff can smell the water and will fall into your well trying to reach it. Also would not put quick connector or any other type of shut off on the water line. If someone takes out the quick connect or closes off the hose without turning off the breaker, pumps burns out quickly.

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  3. #3
    If I only have the cap off when I'm running water, and put the cap back on the well as soon as I'm done, do I still need the sanitary cap? Will that restrict putting the metal cap back on?

    I don't think there is a fear of turning off the water without shutting the breaker because I'm the only one there.

    If I hook the hose to a sprinkler, will that restrict the flow too much and cause any kind of problem to the pump? For instance, will it keep trying to pump and not be able to and burn up?


  4. #4
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    Without a well seal, I do not see what you are going to hang the pump and pipe on? Hose won't hurt as long as you use enough sprinklers that it doesn't blow the hose up with pressure.

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  5. #5
    Ahhh... I hadn't thought about that. I guess I thought that the rope would hold it all up, and I'd tie the rope to the outside of the casing somehow.

    Sigh. Suppose I ought to hire someone? I looked at the directions with the pump last night. I'm afraid I'll electrocute myself!!!! I didn't know about the grounding rod, too.


  6. #6
    Pump guy speedbump's Avatar
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    Forget the rope. If you can't get the pump back by pulling on the pipe the pump hangs from, that rope isn't going to help a bit.

    bob...


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  7. #7
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    Hanging on a rope is not a good idea. Even then the rope would be in the way so you couldn't put the cap back on. Well seal is not that big a deal. I'll bet Bob here a pumpsandtanks can help you with that.

    Wiring a 2 wire pump is no more difficult than wiring an electric oven. But if you don't know electricity, be careful, you usually only get one lesson.

    By the time you purchase everthing you need, you will probably spend 800 to 1,000 bucks. $1,600.00 sounds very reasonable for turn key job. Many people ask about the quality of products purchased from the big box stores compared to professional quality equipment. As a pump professional we have been told by the manufactures that we get better quality equipment than the box stores do. However, you might get a plastic discharge head instead of a metal one on the pump. You might get a rubber air valve on the tank instead of a metal one. But other than that we have found that the equipment is basically the same as the so called "professional quality" equipment that the professional have to pay more for. It is the little things that the professionals have learned the hard way that makes the difference. Professionally installed, even the equipment at the box stores will last longer than if you DIY. Knowing how to make an underwater electric splice, where in the well to install the pump, how to hang it, how to keep it from cycling too often, and many other "little" things are what makes professional installations better. Some so called "professionals" may just be reading the same instructions that you are reading. Make sure you use a well service company that has a good reputation and knows what they are doing or you just as well install it yourself.

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  8. #8
    Typically for the depth you are talking, a pump company is a waste of money... I can pull my pump by hand over hand from 95', it's 1/2 hp, the pipe is 1" black poly it has no torque arrestor, 3/8" polyethlene rope which is a safety rope incase the pipe slips from it's barb fitting, and you should be able to pull the pump using just the rope.

    You will need a sanitary well cap anyway so just buy one, it will have a tapped hole on the under side you can screw an eyebolt into to tie off the safety rope. The weight of the pump should be supported by the rope unless you are using galvanized steel pipe.

    I would just plumb a hose bib into the outlet of the well pipe, forget the quick disconnect.

    Only real problem I see electrically is using the circuit breaker as a disconnect switch, other than being against NEC it wears out the breaker, I saw one used that way for lighting in a barn and everytime it was used, it would arc inside... amazingly the barn is still standing and that was 15 years ago.

    I've never read the directions that come with the pump... Bob, do you need a ground rod at the well? If so, why don't they just use the steel shaft as the ground rod, it certainly goes deeper.

    I would think as a temporary installation you would be safe enough just running that green wire ground back to your power pole, where you must have a ground rod? I assume that is also where your meter box is... add a switched outlet to one of those knockout holes in the meter box and you have a switched disconnect.

    Rancher






  9. #9
    I didn't think about it, but the guy that hooked up my electric at the pole put in a 220 outlet on the pole, and made me an extension cord to run to the well. I could just unplug the cord instead of flipping the breaker all the time.

    What is a hose bib? The only reason I was thinking a quick-connect was so that I could take the garden hose off and put the well cap back on easily.




  10. #10
    Pump guy speedbump's Avatar
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    I wouldn't use a plug to start a sub motor, it might weld the plug to the female receptacle.

    I don't think a ground rod is needed either Rancher. If the casing is metal it is a great ground. Here we have to bond a lug to the casing and attach it to the pressure switch/control box so it hooks up with the green ground wire.

    bob...


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