Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Ancient deep well pump setup.

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    , Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Posts
    5

    Ancient deep well pump setup.

    Hello. I moved into an old house with a deep well, 2 line, setup that just started losing it's prime overnight while it's idle. I know very little about the setup, how deep, etc. I do know the well is a 2" PVC case and has the jet assy on top with a single drop down inside. Distance to the pump is only 5 feet. The jet case is all rusted and starting to leak around it's seal to the PVC which by the way is threaded on the 2" PVC with a standard male end vs. bolts and compression ring set. The 2 lines to it are 1" PVC and before I cut through them I thought I'd ask and see if someone here has some experience with this type of jet assy (first time I've seen one). Am I correct in thinking to separate the jet from the 2" PVC well that I just clamp on to the well to keep it from twisting and unscrew the jet assy. In my mind the whole down tube with foot valve will turn and all come out together like this?
    Appreciate any info and thanks.
    Dan



  2. #2
    Pump guy speedbump's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Murphy, NC. USA.
    Posts
    11,735
    I hope that's not what your pump looks like.

    What you have is a horizontal deep well jet pump with a single pipe jet. The gizmo on top of the 2" PVC with the two pipes going in is the casing adaptor. It transitions the two pipes into a suction pipe which is screwed into the bottom of the adaptor and makes the casing (2") the return pressure pipe. The jet is on the bottom of the drop pipe which is the suction pipe. The depth of the jet will be determined by the water level in the well. If you cut the two pipes, loosen the bolts on the casing adaptor (or just take them out) you can then turn the casing adaptor clockwise to loosen the leathers then try to pull it out. It's going to be heavy.

    Products and Pricing

  3. #3
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    , Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Posts
    5
    Thanks for the reply. Yes the pump/motor looks very similar. There's no head press. reading stamped on the spec plate just HP .8 and voltage 220. Not too much to go on if/when it comes time to replace that.
    From your explanation of the casing adapter and the jet being down at the bottom, does this mean that there's probably no foot valve on the end? I'm trying to picture this configuration in my mind and what I'm filling when I prime it in the mornings.
    Again, thanks for your information and I guess I'll see just what I'm getting into in the morning.

  4. #4
    Pump guy speedbump's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Murphy, NC. USA.
    Posts
    11,735
    There has to be a footvalve on the bottom of the jet. It would cycle itself to death otherwise. There is nowhere to put a check valve up top except behind the pump and that's a very bad idea.

    The jet isn't necessarily on the bottom, just down to the water level.

    Products and Pricing

  5. #5
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    , Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Posts
    5
    quote:Originally posted by speedbump

    I hope that's not what your pump looks like.

    What you have is a horizontal deep well jet pump with a single pipe jet. The gizmo on top of the 2" PVC with the two pipes going in is the casing adaptor. It transitions the two pipes into a suction pipe which is screwed into the bottom of the adaptor and makes the casing (2") the return pressure pipe. The jet is on the bottom of the drop pipe which is the suction pipe. The depth of the jet will be determined by the water level in the well. If you cut the two pipes, loosen the bolts on the casing adaptor (or just take them out) you can then turn the casing adaptor clockwise to loosen the leathers then try to pull it out. It's going to be heavy.

    Products and Pricing



    Here's a shot I took this AM of the actual case adapter. As you can see it's in rough shape (and a vertical adapter used for horizontal). I packed clay (light blue in pic) around the leaky area last night just to see if it would effect the pump drying out overnight and needing re-priming in the morning, also to verify that I'm looking in the right area. Low and behold no priming needed this morning so this must be the culprit. I'm worried that when I cut the 2 pump lines out of the way and have to turn counter-clockwise to remove the adapter (because it's threaded to the well casing) that the down pipe inside with the jet/ejector and foot valve doesn't rotate with the adapter causing it to release and fall. Possibly the leathers stuck or something else preventing the pipe from turning? Never attempted this before and why I'm on here with the experienced. (nail biting smiley here).
    Thanks again.
    Dan

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    , SE Texas, .
    Posts
    1,766
    Looks like a shallow well jet right on top of the well head. In that case you only need a shallow well pump, no packer or such.

    Good luck.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    FL/GA, , .
    Posts
    1,199
    i think TW is right, looks like a shallow adapter to me too. where is the check valve?

  8. #8
    Pump guy speedbump's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Murphy, NC. USA.
    Posts
    11,735
    I don't think it's a jet. I think it's just a casing adaptor we have never seen before. I have never seen one that threads onto casing, but it's in Thailand if I'm not mistaken. They do things differently there. It may also be that the jet is like the old F&W Springdog. It had reverse threads that tightened a rubber instead of using leathers. There were four stainless slats for the lack of a better word that pushed out against the casing to hold the bottom part of the jet while you turned the top half to tighten the rubber. I have no idea what might happen when you turn Dan's adaptor though. If it were mine and I was going to pull the jet, I would dig down and cut the two inch then pull the jet straight up. Unless of coarse, it's different than the ones we use here.

    Products and Pricing

  9. #9
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    , Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Posts
    5
    There's no check valve above ground anywhere in the system. Below the casing adapter is still unknown. Talking with my (Thai) FIL this morning, who built this place around 40 years ago, he seems to recall the well depth about 30 meters. I pointed out the problem of the casing adapter leaking and he said it was the original one. The pump has been replaced since installation along with some PVC here and there, tank float switches, etc.
    After a lot of research into various well setups and 'hearing' what the pro's on here are saying I believe this job may be best left to someone in the business. I'm one who likes to 'do it yourself' but this might be biting off more than I can chew. Too many unknowns and I probably don't have the necessary equipment to handle what's ahead. You can bet I'll be in the middle of everything, soaking it all in, while the repairs are going on though.
    I really appreciate all the time and information from everyone!
    Dan



  10. #10
    Pump guy speedbump's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Murphy, NC. USA.
    Posts
    11,735
    Please post back when you get it done with a full report of what you learned. We are all curious. It's just our nature![;^)]

    Products and Pricing

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •