When I first started playing golf, I was all about power. As I got a little older, I realized that golf was not all about power. In fact, uncontrolled power is a disadvantage.

Eventually, I realized that it was better to hit a seven iron ten feet away from the hole than a nine iron to thirty feet.

Then a while later, I realized the importance of the 100 yard marker. I found that by laying up to 100 yards left me with a lot of shots that were very similar.

In time, my wedge play from 100 yards got to be pretty good. It still is.

Well, the benefit of hitting as many shots as possible from a specific distance is that you are hitting the same shot a lot. What if you are 110 yards out?

You know exactly what it takes to hit the first hundred, so you have a known reference. That being your 100 yard swing. It makes the adjustment to hit it 110 yards a lot easier.

But how does that apply to putting?

If you spend some of your practice time mastering one distance, say 15 feet, it makes adjusting for different length putts a whole lot easier.

Instead of trying to figure out how hard to hit the ball to make it go 20 feet, you will know you have to hit it slightly harder than the 15 foot stroke you have mastered.

If you can roll the ball a specific distance every time, you will need to make smaller adjustments than the guy who has to start every putt from scratch.

It is best to keep golf simple, and one way to do that is to learn specific shots that give you a reference point for playing all the rest.