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Thread: PUMP HOUSE

  1. #1

    PUMP HOUSE

    I HAVE A PLACE IN NORTHERN WISCONSIN. IT GETS PRETTY COLD UP THERE AND I HAVE TO BUILD A PUMP HOUSE FOR THE SHALLOW WELL PUMP THAT WILL SUPPLY WATER TO OUR TRAILOR ABOUT 100FT OR SO AWAY.
    FROM WHAT I HAVE BEEN TOLD YOU CAN NOT DIG A PIT ANYMORE SO IT WILL HAVE TO BE ABOVE GROUND.
    HAS ANYONE EVER HAND TO BUILD A PUMP HOUSE AND IF SO WHAT DO YOU DO TO KEEP IT FROM FREEZING IN THE WINTER?

  2. #2
    Pump guy speedbump's Avatar
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    If it were me, I'de dig the pit. Your not pulling a permit to do this anyway. The pit is the safest.

    But if you want to be legal, you should have a pitless adaptor outside the building so you can access the well, then pipe into the pump house. Once there, you will have to insulate the heck out of the walls, put in some kind of heat and hope the power doesn't go out.

    bob...

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  3. #3
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    I don't have the winters you have but do have two pump houses. I use electric flood lights on a thermostat. You can get than at most farm supply stores. They also have heating devices for pipes and other devices that may work well.

  4. #4
    I also live in Wisconsin and have a cabin in the woods. The pump house is 4' by 6' and has three inches of DOW insulation on the walls, door and ceiling.

    I built a box around the pump and expansion tank of one and half inch DOW foam panels. On the top I doubled the layers f foam so there's approixmately three inches of insulation. In early winter a 40 watt light bulb supplies the heat. A small pump house heater would be better, especially with a controller to set the temperature.

    The pipe from the well to pump house and then from the pump house to house needs to be below the frost line. The pipe as it rises up to pump house and back to the trailer needs to be insulated as well.

    If the use is only seasonal, a drainable pitless adapter can be installed to drain the lines after use. Opening the valve will drain the water suppply lines except the toilet, water heater above shower valves. Still heat the pump house and insulate the pipes. Watch out for heat tape.

    Talk to area well drillers for ideas and suggestions. Check with your neighbors for ideas. Mine use bales of hay aorund the pump house to help insulate the surrounding ground.

    -Greg

  5. #5
    quote:Originally posted by Greg56In early winter a 40 watt light bulb supplies the heat.
    Two 25 watt bulbs would be better, in case it burns out.

    Rancher

  6. #6
    Rancher is correct in using two 25 watt lamps. However, later in the season I may use two 40 watt lamps in a double socket. I look for lamps rated at 130 volts which have a slightly stronger figament and can withstand votage swings.

    Light and heat output is slighter lower. Use new lamps each time since the figament become brittle will use and age.

    Better yet, if the cabin is seasonal, plan to winterized it each time you leave and your worries about the bulbs burning out or the power going off are no longer a concern.

    Better safe than sorry if you can't check on the heat source.

    It can get very cold during Wisconsin's winters.

    -Greg

  7. #7
    Pump guy speedbump's Avatar
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    As I always said in Michigan: "Colder than a well diggers A**."

    bob...

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