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  1. #1
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    Failing Pump?

    I have a Myers 1/2 hp 8 gpm 115 volt submersible pump in a 4" diameter well that is about 100 ft deep. The pressure switch went in the spring and I went for a 40-60 psi switch which worked fine for awhile. Now however the pump seems to cut out after being on for awhile (teenager showering, sprinkler on in the backyard...) I have sat at the pressure switch and measuerd the voltage going to the pump, and all looks fine, but when the problem is present the switch will send 120 volt to the pump and the pump seems to have trouble building the pressure up...hangs at 40, or even drops below, at times to zero. This only seems to happen under high load to the pump. Can I test something to figure out if the pump is being thermally overloaded? I replaced the pump myself about 6 years ago or so... my pressure tank was a little low this spring when I replaced the pressure switch. Could I have a pump that is on the way out? A friend asked if I had used torque arrestors when I installed the pump... I don't think I did...might I simply have a bad connection?

    Thanks for any advice,,
    Dan

  2. #2
    Pump guy speedbump's Avatar
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    You would do better at troubleshooting if you could locate an amp meter. They you could measure the amp draw when this takes place. Max amps on a 1/2hp 115 volt sub motor is 12 amps. If the motor is pulling more than 12 it will certainly trip the overload.

    Torque arrestors are a joke, so don't waste your money. Just invest in some good vinyl electrical tape and tape the wire to the pipe every ten feet.

    bob...

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  3. #3
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    Thanks for the reply...tested the current at the pressure switch when the switch was calling for water and got 12.6 amps. The sticker I have for the Myers pumpsays it is rated at 11.9. What do these numbers mean? I haven't tried measuring the amperage when the pump (?) is misbehaving... need to stress it by turning the sprinkler on for 1/2 hour or so and then be down by the pressure switch to test the amps.... will try this afternoon.

    Dan

  4. #4
    Pump guy speedbump's Avatar
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    It means your motor or your pump are on their way out. The higher than normal amps means a bearing is dragging a little or an impeller or two are grinding against their diffuser trying to over work the motor. Either way, it is probably going to die soon.

    bob...

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  5. #5
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    So... the amps jump up to 35 at the times when the pump is "struggling" to build pressure. Then the amps fall to zero and the pressure in the system also drops to zero, then it seems like the pump kicks in and the amps go back up to the 12.4 to 12.6 range and the pump builds pressure to 60 and cycles a few times between 40 and 60 before the problem begins again. Failing punmp eh? After just 6 to 8 years of action? I guess my low charge pressure in my pressure tank could have precipitated the failing of this pump. I guess I'll kick myself in the butt all the way to the plumbing stiore to shell out the #300 + bucks for the new pump. Anyone else want to chime in here? On the problem that is, not kicking my butt!

    Thanks,

    dan

  6. #6
    quote:Originally posted by Dan ErlandsonFailing punmp eh? After just 6 to 8 years of action?
    Dan, 6 to 8 years... guess what the adverage is for a pump, ding ding 7 years.

    Rancher.

    Of course you could buy your pump from Speedbump, and he'll sell you a cycle stop valve also.

  7. #7
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    OK so what exactly is a cycle stop valve? What are the suggestions for my replacement? Local plumbing store probably still carries Myers brand. I looked at the web store associated with this forum and saw a 1/2hp 10 gpm pumpfor around $370. What is the logic for my choice at this point in time... I'd like to do this as inexpensively as possible, but then again hauling up that 100ft of PVC pipe with the pump at the end ain't no fun.

    Dan

  8. #8
    Pump guy speedbump's Avatar
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    The Cycle Stop Valve is a valve that keeps your pump from cycling as long as your using a gallon per minute or more. You can use them with a very small tank. I recommend a 42 gallon bladder tank. The 1/2hp you saw on my website was actually $344.40. This is a two wire. If you must have a three wire I can drop ship you one, it's the same price.

    Thanks for the plug Rancher.

    bob...

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  9. #9
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    So if I am using more than 1 gpm then the valve keeps the pumpfrom cycling. I am not sure I understand this or the logic behind it... The CSV tricks the pressure tank somehow into letting the pump continue to pump? (no cycling) this is good because of the wear and taear on the pump due to start up? What will this due to my water pressure if the teenager is taling a shower? I don't have a priblem with the pressure fluctuating more if I am outside with a hose, but inside in the bath it might be an issue. Couldn't I just go for a bigger pressure tank? I guess that this is more $ than a CSV. Need to chek the size of my pressure tank... Where does the CSV get mounted?

    Thanks,


    Dan

  10. #10
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    As posted the CSV stops the pump from cycling, it holds a steady pressure at what the CSV is set for. So your water pressure stays at that number instead of rising and falling with the effects of the pressure switch and bladder tank.
    When you turn the water on it is under pressure from the bladder tank. Depending on the size of the tank the water will slowly drop until it reaches a pre set pressure and the pressure switch turns on the pump. The pump then supplies water to the house and refills the tank at the same time until the cutout pressure is reached when the switch turns off the pump. This is repeated as long as you use water. on, off, on, off etc.
    With a CSV the same thing happens except when the water in the tank is used the pressure switch turns on the pump and the CSV maintains the pressure, in my case 50#, and holds it as long as 1 gallon per minute is used. The motor does not shut off, until the water is shut off at the house, sprinkler etc. At this time the pressure tank is refilled and the pump runs until the cut out pressure is reached.
    By not allowing the pump to continually recycle it helps extend the life of the pump. The pump gets most of it's wear and tear from this cycling, not running.
    I have no dog in this fight other than I use one on my home well and wouldn't have a well without it.
    Rancher doesn't see the need, particularly in his application so he dismisses the CSV. Just his opinion, which is OK.
    I installed a CSV and a new tank, and a new pressure switch set at 40-60 and now have a constant 50# of pressure with almost no fluctuation.

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