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Thread: Pressure switch location

  1. #1
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    Pressure switch location

    I have a 1.5HP submersible pump with a 120 gallon galvanized tank. Originally, the tank was located in my shop about 10 feet from the well head. The pressure switch was located on the side of the tank about 2/3 of the way up from the bottom of the tank.

    About a year ago, I had everything in the well and the pump controller replaced. I also had the galvanized tank moved to the new pump house that was built around the existing well, so now the tank is about two feet from the wellhead.

    The work was done by the same guy that originally drilled the well about 17 years ago. One of the things he did was to move the pressure switch from the side of the tank to a nipple that was threaded into the check valve which is about six inches from the wellhead. The check valve also contains the schrader valve. When I asked why he didn't put the new pressure switch on the tank like he did before, he said they don't do it that way any more.

    Is there any reason why it should be on the tank vs. on the water line near the wellhead, or vice versa? I plan on adding a CSV soon. Does that have any effect on where the pressure switch should be other than making sure the CSV is between the wellhead and the check valve (and pressure switch)?

    Thanks,
    Ira

  2. #2
    Pump guy speedbump's Avatar
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    It really doesn't matter where he put the pressure switch as long as it isn't far enough from the tank to make the motor false start from water hammer.

    The CSV works much better with a bladder tank than it does with a large galvanized tank such as yours. Not that it won't prevent cycling, but the constant pressure will take longer to obtain.

    bob...

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  3. #3
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    The CSV will work with the Galv tank but, it may not cycle on and off enough for the bleeder system to recharge enough air. Replace the galv tank with a 20 gallon bladder tank would work better.

    Cycle Stop Valve Website

  4. #4
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    In my area, galvanized tanks are the norm due to the presence of suphur odor. In fact, the few times that my tank has gotten waterlogged, my first indication was the sulphur odor.

    Valveman...are you saying that with the CSV, my tank would get waterlogged often because it would not be sufficently recharged?

    Thanks,
    Ira

  5. #5
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    The bleeder orifice air charge system only works when the pump cycles. With the CSV the pump will cycle about 75% less. You can move the bleeder twice as far down in the well, so when it does cycle it puts twice as much air in the tank. That is unless you are using a small compressor for air charge which works fine with the CSV.

    Cycle Stop Valve Website

  6. #6
    Pump guy speedbump's Avatar
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    The air pump is what we do here to get rid of sulphur odor. It's a system we devised using a galvanized tank. With the air pump you don't need the bleeder or the additional check valve with the schrader valve and your tank will never waterlog. We still use a bladder tank just to back up the air pump if it were to fail and we always use a CSV. I just described my own system too.

    bob...

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  7. #7
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    Some more info on my setup to help explain my goal...

    My water system feeds my house and my lawn irrigation system. The irrigation system zones are each sized for 28GPM at 50PSI, and when a zone is open the pump runs continuously as desired.

    There is a tee on the downstream side of the galvanized tank. One side of the tee goes to the irrigation system (RPZ, master valve, etc.).

    The other side of the tee goes to the house water system. It goes to the water softener, then a double check valve, then to the house. Also, a couple of feet after the double check valve, there is a tee that goes to a large bladder tank. The bladder tank provides additional storage/pressure for the house only (because of the double check valve before the bladder tank). I think it is a 120 gallon equivalent tank. Remember that the pressure switch for the pump is located before the galvanized tank.

    There are two people in the house, so let's assume the average water use of 120 GPD, not including the irrigation system. On the house side, I think I have about 40 gallons of drawdown (20 gallons per tank), maybe a little less. That means that no single water use event will cause the pump to turn on more than once. For example, a single use of the shower won't use more than 40 gallons, the washing machine won't use more than 40 gallons in a single fill, etc. Of course, if the shower, dishwasher, and washing machine all used water at the same time, it could exceed the available 40 gallons once, but that's unlikely. Therefore, it seems that the CSV will have little, if any, effect on the number of pump cycles for normal household water usage. This also implies that my pump is only cycling about four times a day on a "normal" day, maybe a few more times when the water softener is regenerating, a heavy wash day, or something else is going on. Even then, the pump will be "resting" for at least several minutes before each cycle.

    What I really want the CSV valve to do is give me flexibility for the irrigation system. I need to add additional zones, and I don't want to be forced to design all zones to use 28GPM at 50PSI. Since the pump only comes on once per "watering day" during the irrigation cycle now (because the zones are sized correctly), the CSV won't reduce cycling for the current irrigation system, but it will allow me flexibility in designing future zones which is my goal.

    So, given the above (which works now), will adding a CSV affect the air recharging in my galvanized tank since it seems like the CSV won't reduce pump cycles very much in my current setup?

    Thanks,
    Ira

  8. #8
    Pump guy speedbump's Avatar
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    Other than the double check valve (whatever that is) and the bladder tank on the house side of the dcv, your plan sounds good to me.

    bob...

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  9. #9
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    When the pump runs continuously for the existing irrigation system, you are losing the air out of your galv tank. As the water passes through it, it mixes with the air and takes it out the sprinklers. Only when your pump cycles on for the house use does the tank get a shot of air. The CSV is not going to change any of this but, I do not see why you are not already having a problem keeping air in the galv tank. The CSV will give you the flexibility with the new irrigation zones. Without the CSV, running a smaller zone will probably cause rapid cycling as the galv tank must certainly be waterlogged, and the double check keeps the bladder tank from being any help with the irrigation zones. Can you run a garden hose by itself on the irrigation side to see if I am correct?

    Cycle Stop Valve Website

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