Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Pump wiring...

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1

    Pump wiring...

    Hey guys... a quick question...

    The pump doesn't require a neutral, right ?

    So, I can run 12/2 w)gnd to the pump and put 240 VAC in there.

    Question is, (I don't have a copy of NEC here) what does the code say regarding pump wiring ? Can I do that, or do I need to run 12/3 w)gnd ? (I do know that I need to paint the white wire if I run 240 on a white/black pair)

    Is GFI usually required ???

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    You never need a neutral with 240 VAC, because there should be nothing returning on the neutral. You always need the "green wire" ground, I haven't read the NEC on above ground pumps but doubt if you need a GFI for submersible. And yes you need to mark the white wire on both ends as being black (black electrical tapes works).

    Rancher

  3. #3
    quote:Originally posted by Rancher
    You never need a neutral with 240 VAC
    On a pump I agree, but some loads (i.e. electric clothes dryer, electric range, linear amplifier...) there are some 120 volt circuits to run lights, timers, cooling fans, etc. so they do need the neutral. But yes, a pump motor needs no neutral.

    There I go answering my own post, but I guess my real question is about the GFI. I was thinking that the GFI might require the neutral... I've only done 120 V GFI circuits so the question never came up. The more I think about it though, since the GFI breaker would be in the panel, the neutral would be there if needed anyway...

    Which makes me think of another question:

    If the ground buss in the panel is bonded to the house plumbing (by code), and then you run a second ground out to the pump, which is already grounded by the plumbing, won't you create a GROUND LOOP ?

    I need to get a copy of NEC. Maybe someone at work has one...

    [hmmm, just saw where PatOZ has one on CD ... hmmm... ohhhh PAAAATTT!]
    [88]

    Thanks!
    Jeff

  4. #4
    Not sure what the NEC says about that... but the power company grounds at each and every power pole and attaches that to a running ground, normally the top wire for lightning protection.

    Rancher

  5. #5
    Pump guy speedbump's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Murphy, NC. USA.
    Posts
    11,785
    I would think if you do run a neutral to your pump, you would be expected to install another breaker box to accept the 115 volt breakers to be used with the neutral. As opposed to running a 115 volt appliance off one of the pump wires to ground. Which could unbalance the load on the pump.

    Pat???


    Frequently asked questions at a glance.

    Return to Pumps & Tanks

  6. #6
    Past Newbie
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Pensacola, Florida, USA.
    Posts
    180
    The correct and safe way would be to install a separate small panel and connect the 115VAC circuit on it's own breaker. As far as unbalancing the circuit, it does not matter which way you do it. The end result will be the same.

    Currently, I do not have the NEC program installed. If I can locate it and install it, I'll take a look and see what I can find as soon as I have a chance. I've been in the dock rebuilding business for the last week. And believe me, when I get home at night, I am too tired to even type. Every mussel in by body is screaming. As the saying goes..."I'm too old for this s**t."

  7. #7
    No rush Pat, thanks for jumpin' in!

    I found a copy today at work, and spent about a half hour looking through it at lunch today. I couldn't locate an article that specifically talks about well pumps. Hot tubs, swimming pools, YES MOST DEFINITELY NEED the GFI breakers. But from what I can see, wiring for the well pump just falls under normal MOTOR WIRING articles.

    I'm just gonna paint the whites and run the 12/2 at 240 V (which around here is actually closer to 250!!) and if the inspector don't like it, I'll change it... simple as that, no big deal.

    It does appear that the local codes will require a disconnect at the pump though, that's easy enough too.

  8. #8
    Past Newbie
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Pensacola, Florida, USA.
    Posts
    180
    It sounds like you will be OK with your plan.

    Just be sure to locate the disconnect 6' or less from the well. It also has to be in sight of anyone working on the pump. This is for safety reasons.

  9. #9
    quote:Originally posted by PatOz
    ...This is for safety reasons...
    One thing I forgot to mention;

    Inspector Dude also told me that the d/c had to be of the "locking" variety, so "Tag Out, Lock Out" could be used. All the d/c's I've ever used have had the holes for the lock hasp, so I'm OK with that.

    Our town re-wrote a lot of the local building codes within the past few years to emphasize current OSHA rules. It seems that now they can come onto a jobsite and shut ya down if you aren't in compliance with OSHA standards.

  10. #10
    Past Newbie
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Pensacola, Florida, USA.
    Posts
    180
    TrooperII,

    I assume from your post, you are having this job inspected? I feel for you!!

    Are they telling you that you have to use a "Tag Out, Lock Out" type box? Most of the time that is only required on commercial type installations that are not within view of the electricians and not home situations.

    The NEC requires the disconnect for residential applications be located 6' or less from the appliance and within sight of the person working on the appliance. That is for their own safety.

    Let me know what the out come is...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •